Avon Valley National Park

80 km north-east of Perth via the Toodyay Road. Turn left into Morangup Road, and left onto Quarry Road. From summer to winter, from north to south, and from high outcrops to deep river and stream valleys, the forests of Avon Valley National Park are constantly changing. The Avon River flows in winter and spring when the river churns over spectacular rapids. During summer and autumn the river diminishes to a…

Alexander Morrison National Park

Address : Eganu WA 6515 250kms north from Perth. 65km east from Green Head, 40km west from Coorow, along the Coorow-Green Head Rd. This 8,500 hectare Park was declared a National Park in 1970. It was named after Alexander Morrison (1849-1913) who was the first official Western Australian government botanist in the Bureau of Agriculture between 1897-1906. He collected specimens extensively in Western Australia and Victoria, briefly at Gawler in South…

Baw Baw National Park

Address : Baw Baw VIC 3833 Tel : 13 19 63 The 13,300 ha Baw Baw National Park covers a substantial part of the Baw Baw Plateau and sections of the Thomson and Aberfeldy River valleys. One of the two Victorian national parks with large areas of sub-alpine vegetation, it offers outstanding views, colourful wildflowers in early summer and open grassy plains with Snow Gum woodlands. ฒฝิพฬ

Alpine National Park

Address : Cobungra VIC 3898 Tel :(03) 8627 4700 The Alpine National Park forms a protected area that covers almost all of Australia’s high country. It’s one of eight Australian Alps national parks that are managed co-operatively to ensure that Australia’s mainland alpine and sub-alpine environments are protected consistently and that policies and guidelines across State and territory borders are compatible. Australia’s Alps are vitally important as a source of…

Alfred National Park

Alfred National Park contains some of the most southerly occurrences of warm temperate rainforest in Australia. Many plant species found in the park are uncommon in the rest of Victoria. The park protects high conservation values, rare flora and fauna and diverse landscape values. There are many wet forest and rainforest bird species including ground thrush, lyrebirds, pilot-birds, powerful owl and the brown flycatcher. Wallabies and wombats also inhabit the park. Warm…

Hartz Mountains National Park

Hartz Mountains National Park is 84 km south-west of Hobart. It is a window into the south-west wilderness, offering views of remote mountain ranges as far as the southern coast. As well as spectacular views of a landscape which has been shaped by glaciers during past ice ages, the park offers a variety of unique features. Waterfalls tumble off the dolerite range that runs through the centre of the park…

Freycinet National Park

Jutting out into the sea on Tasmania’s east coast is the rugged and beautiful Freycinet Peninsula. Freycinet National Park consists of knuckles of granite mountains all but surrounded by azure bays and white sand beaches. The dramatic peaks of The Hazards welcome you as you enter the park. Freycinet National Park offers a wide variety of activities. Take a walk to the pass overlooking the perfectly shaped Wineglass Bay or…

Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park

From Hobart, travel west for 2 1/2 hours via the Lyell Highway, or south a similar distance from Launceston via Longford and Poatina on the Lakes Highway (A5). King William Saddle marks the boundary of the park, and indeed a dramatic change in the geology and vegetation of western Tasmania. Nelson Falls marks the western boundary of the park. The Lyell Highway may occasionally be closed by snow in winter….

Douglas-Apsley National Park

From its deep river gorges and waterfalls to its dolerite capped plateau; from dry eucalypt forest and colourful heathlands to pockets of rainforest, Douglas-Apsley National Park is a place of surprising contrasts. This park is one of the few that conserve the diverse wealth of dry sclerophyll forest plants found on the east coast of Tasmania. The crystal clear waters that run through the park are a welcome sight on…

Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Cradle Mountain forms the northern end of the wild Cradle Mountain – Lake St Clair National Park, itself a part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The jagged contours of Cradle Mountain epitomize the feel of a wild landscape, while ancient rainforest and alpine heathlands, buttongrass and stands of colourful deciduous beech provide a range of environments to explore. Icy streams cascading out of rugged mountains, stands of ancient…